12 - 14 November, 2019
Berlin Germany

General (Retd.) Frank Gorenc


Former Commander
U.S. Air Forces in Europe, U.S. Air Forces Africa, NATO Allied Air Command


11:50 AM CLOSING Q&A: IS INFORMATION THE CRITICAL ENABLER FOR THE FUTURE FORCE?

  • Where will information dominance feature within the future capability balance? 
  • If information superiority is to be a core component of the future high-end fight, how can effect still be delivered when access to information is compromised? How do we effectively mitigate against the threat of IW and cyber attack?
  • Is fusion the real challenge? How can the ISR capabilities of advanced combat air systems be exploited and disseminated in the context of the complex environment?
  • To what extent is sensor and data fusion possible on existing platforms? What are the limitations?
  • Are we adequately preparing for F-35 service-entry? How do we leverage the capabilities of existing platforms to field an effective mixed air combat force?

12:30 PM INDUSTRY LEADERS’ PANEL DISCUSSION: DO AIR FORCE REQUIREMENTS MATCH THE DEMANDS OF THE CURRENT AND FUTURE BATTLESPACE?

  • What should the future capability balance look like? What should the balance be between lethality and stealth, and how can survivability be maximised?
  • If information is to be the decisive enabler for future airpower, what opportunities are there to improve the fusion of data aircraft to aircraft and across the joint force?
  • Do emerging concepts for next generation combat air systems take satisfactory account of the current risk threshold? Is a manned fighter a viable options for the future high-end fight?

3:00 PM PANEL DISCUSSION: PREPARING FOR THE FUTURE FIGHT – TOWARDS A TRULY MULTI-DOMAIN CONCEPT OF OPERATIONS

  • Delivering combat airpower in an information age. Achieving information superiority and exploiting it to attain decision advantage
  • How will the fighter’s increased mobility, ISR and global strike support the more comprehensive delivery of airpower in the joint space?
  • Delivering airpower within a truly-multi domain battlespace. Integrating space, cyber and the electromagnetic spectrum for operations in the denied and contested environment
  • How can the superior-information gathering capacity of advanced combat air systems be used to benefit missions that include legacy platforms? 

4:30 PM PANEL DISCUSSION: STRESS TESTING CURRENT CAPABILITIES TO REFINE A CONCEPT FOR THE NEXT GENERATION FIGHTER

  • Inserting NATO’s current force structure within a high-end combat situation. Which capabilities would give out first in the contested environment?
  • Defining a next generation combat air concept. Balancing range, lethality, survivability, affordability and interoperability
  • What effectors will define the future combat air system?
  • How valid is a network-centric concept of operations? Will information reliance prove to be a critical weakness within the future air domain?
  • Attrition as a characteristic of the future combat air environment. Are UCAVs the way forward?  

5:00 PM THE NATO WAR IN KOSOVO—30 YEARS ON AND THE LESSONS LEARNED AND APPLIED

The NATO campaign in Kosovo, based on the gradual application of military force, received considerable criticism from military strategists and others despite the fact that it ultimately did compel Milosevic’s withdrawal at no cost in NATO lives and led to a period of widespread belief that wars can be won with air power alone. What were the shortcomings of the campaign and which, if any, of the lessons learned have been applied? 
  • What were the principal lessons learned from the Kosovo campaign? Are they of any value to future air campaign against a hybrid threat?
  • What lessons did our adversaries learn from this conflict and how have they manifested themselves?
  • How has the chain of command within NATO evolved to enable rapid and decisive effects on the ground? 
  • How has the military-political interface been streamlined to avoid the constraints that hampered the Kosovo campaign and to avoid the ceding of time and initiative to a future aggressor?
  • To what extent has the capability gap between the US Air Force and its European allies been addressed so as to be able to field a balanced and capable application of air power in a future conflict?


11:30 AM COMMANDERS’ STRATEGY DEBATE

This panel is an established feature of the IFC, and provides senior air force leaders with the opportunity to assess the changing nature of combat air operations, and to identify priorities for strategic development, acquisition and training.
  • What does the information age mean for airpower? Has the rise of information as a critical enabler been satisfactorily integrated within airpower concept, doctrine and capability?
  • What is the biggest challenge for airpower in the immediate timeframe?
  • What does the future manned/unmanned balance look like? Will UCAVs define the post-2030 battlespace?
  • Which technologies will have realistically reached sufficient maturity so as to be incorporated into a future combat air platform?
  • What is the one thing we can all agree on and implement that will have a significant impact on acquisition reform?

2:30 PM PANEL DISCUSSION: HOW MUCH DATA IS TOO MUCH DATA?

  • The information capabilities of new and future platforms demand a renewed approach to training and development. If tomorrow’s pilot is to effectively exploit the data that these aircrafts will provide, they must be able to prioritise and act on information at speed, and to adapt the ways in which they acquire and engage a target.
  • Might the information-age pilot suffer from data overload?Training the pilot to take advantage of increased situational awareness and C2
  • Prioritising tasks in a data-heavy setting and adjusting when data is “downed”
  • How is Artificial Intelligence being leveraged to enhance TTPs in a future training regime?


Check out the incredible speaker line-up to see who will be joining General (Retd.) Frank.

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