12 - 14 November, 2019
Berlin Germany

Conference Day One

7:30 am - 8:30 am REGISTRATION AND COFFEE

8:30 am - 9:30 am OPENING CEREMONY: IFC 2018

Opening Remarks from Defence IQ

Opening Remarks from the Lead Sponsors & Conference Partner

Official Photo

Opening Remarks from the Conference Co-Chairs

9:30 am - 10:00 am KEYNOTE SESSION RESERVED FOR THE GERMAN AIR FORCE

  • Leveraging airpower in the context of a complex and evolving global security environment
  • Integrating the future fighter as a core component of the joint force
  • Maintaining an operational edge for NATO airpower in the future battlespace

10:00 am - 10:30 am EXTENDING MODERN AIR WEAPON SYSTEM CAPABILITIES WITH UNMANNED SUPPORT ELEMENTS

  • Combining and Teaming of manned and unmanned assets
  • Artificial Intelligence and Swarming to support complex missions
  • Applications and development outlook

10:30 am - 11:00 am CANADA’S FUTURE FIGHTER CAPABILITY PROJECT

Major General Alain Pelletier - Chief of Fighter Capability, Royal Canadian Air Force
  • Refining the future fighter concept for Canada
  • Identifying the critical effectors for a future combat air system
  • Enforcing Canada’s sovereignty through the decisive deployment of combat airpower. Linking in airpower with a broader approach to national security
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Major General Alain Pelletier

Chief of Fighter Capability
Royal Canadian Air Force

11:00 am - 11:30 am THE FUTURE BATTLESPACE - A EUROPEAN PERSPECTIVE

  • Challenges on interoperability
  • The role of robust military effectiveness
  • The key role of sovereignty on information

11:30 am - 12:00 pm MORNING COFFEE AND NETWORKING

12:00 pm - 12:30 pm THE ROLE OF THE COMBAT FIGHTER WITHIN THE JOINT FORCE

Major General Scott J Zobrist - Commander, 9th Air Force, Air Combat Command, US Air Force
  • Integrating the fighter with the joint force. Exploiting the information capabilities of advanced combat aircraft to support C4ISR for the multi-domain operation
  • Managing the challenge of the contested environment. Sustaining survivability and information dominance for operations in the complex battlespace
  • Delivering a global reach for Air Combat Command. Sustaining and supporting the F-35 for a global operating environment
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Major General Scott J Zobrist

Commander, 9th Air Force, Air Combat Command
US Air Force

  • What should the future capability balance look like? What should the balance be between lethality and stealth, and how can survivability be maximised?
  • If information is to be the decisive enabler for future airpower, what opportunities are there to improve the fusion of data aircraft to aircraft and across the joint force?
  • Do emerging concepts for next generation combat air systems take satisfactory account of the current risk threshold? Is a manned fighter a viable options for the future high-end fight?
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General (Retd.) Frank Gorenc

Former Commander
U.S. Air Forces in Europe, U.S. Air Forces Africa, NATO Allied Air Command

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Lieutenant General (Retd.) Klaus-Peter Stieglitz

Former Commander
German Air Force

1:30 pm - 2:30 pm NETWORKING LUNCH

2:30 pm - 3:00 pm NEXT GENERATION WEAPON SYSTEM, THE SPANISH MOD VISION TOWARDS 2035+

  • Which will be the effectors that support air superiority and precision strike for the future environment?
  • Upgrading existing platforms to take advantage of advanced air weaponry. Extending the life cycle through platform development
  • Leveraging advanced data fusion to support the effective use of air weaponry. The interface between air superiority and situational awareness
  • Delivering combat airpower in an information age. Achieving information superiority and exploiting it to attain decision advantage
  • How will the fighter’s increased mobility, ISR and global strike support the more comprehensive delivery of airpower in the joint space?
  • Delivering airpower within a truly-multi domain battlespace. Integrating space, cyber and the electromagnetic spectrum for operations in the denied and contested environment
  • How can the superior-information gathering capacity of advanced combat air systems be used to benefit missions that include legacy platforms? 
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General (Retd.) Frank Gorenc

Former Commander
U.S. Air Forces in Europe, U.S. Air Forces Africa, NATO Allied Air Command

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Lieutenant General (Retd.) Klaus-Peter Stieglitz

Former Commander
German Air Force

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Major General Jean-Pascal Breton

Programme Lead, Future Combat Air System
French Air Force

3:30 pm - 4:00 pm AFTERNOON TEA AND NETWORKING

4:00 pm - 4:30 pm GERMAN SECURITY AND DEFENCE POLICY – TOUR D’HORIZON

  • An overview of Germany’s security and defence policy
  • Airpower’s role within the contemporary security environment
  • Preparing for the future threat environment. Updating policy priorities to reflect the demands of hybrid warfare
  • Inserting NATO’s current force structure within a high-end combat situation. Which capabilities would give out first in the contested environment?
  • Defining a next generation combat air concept. Balancing range, lethality, survivability, affordability and interoperability
  • What effectors will define the future combat air system?
  • How valid is a network-centric concept of operations? Will information reliance prove to be a critical weakness within the future air domain?
  • Attrition as a characteristic of the future combat air environment. Are UCAVs the way forward?  
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General (Retd.) Frank Gorenc

Former Commander
U.S. Air Forces in Europe, U.S. Air Forces Africa, NATO Allied Air Command

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Wing Commander Andre Adamson

European Bilateral Relations and EU Exit
UK MoD

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Mr Justin Bronk

Research Fellow
RUSI

The NATO campaign in Kosovo, based on the gradual application of military force, received considerable criticism from military strategists and others despite the fact that it ultimately did compel Milosevic’s withdrawal at no cost in NATO lives and led to a period of widespread belief that wars can be won with air power alone. What were the shortcomings of the campaign and which, if any, of the lessons learned have been applied? 
  • What were the principal lessons learned from the Kosovo campaign? Are they of any value to future air campaign against a hybrid threat?
  • What lessons did our adversaries learn from this conflict and how have they manifested themselves?
  • How has the chain of command within NATO evolved to enable rapid and decisive effects on the ground? 
  • How has the military-political interface been streamlined to avoid the constraints that hampered the Kosovo campaign and to avoid the ceding of time and initiative to a future aggressor?
  • To what extent has the capability gap between the US Air Force and its European allies been addressed so as to be able to field a balanced and capable application of air power in a future conflict?

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General (Retd.) Frank Gorenc

Former Commander
U.S. Air Forces in Europe, U.S. Air Forces Africa, NATO Allied Air Command

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Lieutenant General (Retd.) Klaus-Peter Stieglitz

Former Commander
German Air Force

5:30 pm - 5:45 pm CLOSE OF CONFERENCE DAY ONE

5:45 pm - 6:45 pm NETWORKING DRINKS RECEPTION HOSTED BY RAYTHEON

7:00 pm - 10:30 pm GALA DINNER HOSTED BY AIRBUS AND EUROFIGHTER